Migrating away from cash is intimidating – Stickiness of Cash Part 2

Ask any payment professional, and while they might disagree on what’s the best payment experience, they would all agree that Cash is sticky.

And one of the core reasons for the stickiness of cash is that the migration journey is intimidating for most cash-heavy users.

Too many choices

Here are some of the many questions the cash users who want to migrate away from cash, grapple with:

  • Is it safe to use a card for payments
  • Should I use a separate card for ATM withdrawals and purchases
  • What should I start using – prepaid, debit, credit , mobile wallets
  • If it’s a card, should I go for a basic, gold, platinum or some other variant
  • Should I get a product with shopping benefits or one with fuel? or the one with air-miles
  • Should I take a Visa or a MasterCard or a Rupay
  • I have accounts with multiple banks, whose product do I begin with
  • How do I apply for the card? Can I apply online, or do I go to the bank branch?
  • What is a UPI or IMPS payment? How do I do that? What is the fees on the transactions?

…….And it goes on and on.

The simple fact is that there are way too many products with different features, brands, offers,benefits and form-factors. It is a tough choice to make.

And post demonetization, most banks are  show-casing ALL their products in each of their ads. Leaving it to the consumer to pick and choose.

I have seen Mumbai buses covered with ads, that have all the digital payment instruments from that bank. Not sure if most consumers even know what those mean.

 

The famous Malcolm Gladwell research on choices, happiness and spaghetti sauce also harps on the risk of too many choices.

The migration away from cash, has to be made easier with fewer choices or a recommended path to walk on (recommendation itself coming from a trusted partner).

In the absence of this, most consumers prefer a wait-and-watch stance. And the product(s) with simpler choices and/or more brand-ambassadors will see higher adoption. No wonder, many a millennial adopted the mobile wallets. There were no variants of PayTM, Mobikwik etc.

And this brings us to the other point.

Hurdles in the migration

Ok, so you have a cash-user who is convinced about that one digital payment from your bank. How does she go about getting started?

Do you remember the forms you filled to get your first credit card.

I remember that during my Deal4Loans days, the card application forms used to have almost 50+ fields across some 4-5 stages of the online application for most banks.

While the consumer on-boarding has come a long way in the digital era, it still is complicated for many products/banks. Unless the consumer is really convinced about this migration, why would they jump through so many hoops to get the product.

The access and on-boarding has to be simpler. A convinced consumer should be active on Day 0 if not within Hour 1.

In my opinion, if we are serious about displacing cash, we need to make the transition a simpler choice for the consumers.

What do you think?


This is part 2 in a series of posts where I try to understand why Cash is sticky? What are the some of the obvious things, we may have overlooked in our zeal to digitize payments.

Here’s part 1 , where my humble submission is that Cash is not really the enemy. Atleast not in the eyes of the consumers.

Beyond Big Data – A Small and fast data example

Big Data is all the rage. Everywhere you go, any meeting or presentation one sits through, Big Data seems to be there.

But there are opportunities beyond big data. E.g. how we handle small data fast.

Here’s an example of small data that I experience almost everyday.

In many corporate buildings in India, you would notice that you need to punch in the desired floor into a panel, which prompts you which lift-car to hop on to.

Fast data ElevatorsSimple yet brilliant solution.

You club the waiting passengers into specific cars by their desired floors. The average wait time is lower, the average travel time to your floor is significantly lower.

And all the magic happens in a jiffy.

The data becomes irrelevant soon (apart from being used by the algorithm for learning and further optimization). And in a classic example of not-so-big-data. But the fact that this small set of inputs from users is taken, crunched and optimized for elevator allocation in almost real time makes it so amazing.

Small but fast Data.

In Data-led-solutions, the following typically have significant impact:

  • Data-accuracy: How accurate is the data that we feed into the system
  • Data-freshness:How fresh is the data as it moves across the value chain
  • Data-velocity: What is the speed with which we process and move data

This small-data use-case is very high on the data-velocity parameter and I guess just solving for data-velocity has allowed for the solution to be adopted.

So in summary, there is life beyond Big Data too. ūüôā

What do you think?

Good rules should be designed for higher adoption

How do we drive adoption for rules in a country, a community?

Should a good rule be easily enforceable too?

I think it should be.

If we want to build a society where most follow the rules, enforceability should be an important criteria.

To decide whether a new rule should be introduced or not. Whether an existing rule needs to be modified or scrapped.

Why?

It is my belief, that when we have rules that can be easily broken without any consequences, it sends a signal to the community. And this signal usually leads to a gradual loss of respect for the law of the land and for the fellow citizens.

Effective rules implementation

Let me explain with an example of two rules, which most of us are familiar with

  • Front seat passengers should wear seat belts while traveling in a car
  • All vehicles should have a valid pollution-under-control (PUC) certificate

While both these were introduced in the last 20 years or so in NCR, the first one has seen significant levels of adoption whereas we all know that very few cars and bikes have a valid PUC certificate.

Why?

If you ask me, the reason is very simple.

For seat-belts, the fact that you are complying (or not) is visible each and every time you are driving. Any traffic-cop who sees you not wearing the seat belt can pull you over and issue a challan. So you run a very high risk of being punished if you are out on the road w/o wearing your seat belts.

Contrast this with the pollution certificate rule.

A traffic cop on the road has no clue if your vehicle currently has a valid PUC certificate or not. Hence the cop would rarely pull you aside asking for the certificate. It is usually asked for when you have already been stopped for some reason and they feel that they might put more pressure on you if you are w/o the PUC. Hence as car owners, we are usually not very afraid to drive w/o this certificate. The risk is just too low. And hence very few cars actually have a valid PUC certificate.

So while almost everyone knows that the laws need them to drive a non-polluting vehicle, very few actually end up doing so.

And I think its very simply just the issue of how easily the rule can be enforced.

In my opinion we should have few rules, but all should be enforced strictly.

What do you think?

Showing Contact Addresses in Google Maps

Quick Summary:

Here’s a small product feature recommendation for Google Maps on Android. Currently when I am in Google Maps and typing in the search box, it throws results that match with Google Places directory on the web. If it also throws matches with local contacts in the phone (or Google account) that have an address field added, it will ease usage.

Google Maps & Contacts
Background:

A quick background will help understand the use-case much better. I was travelling to Jaipur and wanted to go to my friend’s place in Bani Park. I had asked him for his address the day before and stored that in the phone’s contact against his name. Now when I was close to Bani park and looking for exact directions to his place, I had to

  • go to the Contacts,
  • search for his name,
  • View and copy the address,
  • Close Contacts and open Google Maps,
  • click on search(in GMaps) and paste the address (without the door number etc),
  • See the matching list of places from Googles Places directory,
  • Choose the right one and get started

Recommended Solution:

It would have been so much easier if

  • I go to G Maps
  • Click on search and type the friend’s name
  • IF there is an address field against it, gets thrown up
  • [CHALLENGE] – Smartly remove the part(s) of address like door or flat number and match it with Google Places
  • Get started

Better still would be if
GMaps and contact addresses
Once I have used the (text based) address for directions inside maps for the first time, it asks me to “pin” the place on the map when i reach my destination,so that an accurate latlon (latitude longitude) can be entered in a hidden field against this address.

If this pinning of a text address is done, it can add more wow – as soon as I open up Google Maps at a particular location, it can show me my pins in the vicinity – no more typing or searching needed – just choose the pin for directions and get started.

What do you think?

Is this something that would make your GMaps experience better? Do let me know in the comments section below – will love to hear your feedback.

#Android #GoogleMaps #GMaps #Google

Easier to be Krishna than to be Arjun

The other day, my mom shared a powerful and thought-provoking quote, that she has just read.

It’s easier to be Krishna, than to be Arjun !!

And she went on to explain, that being Krishna requires one to look inside and discover the highest qualities that each of us are bestowed with.

But to be an Arjun, one needs to be full of faith.

Infact have so much faith and trust, that you see a Guru in your friend, who then becomes the Krishna in your life.

Krishna ArjunaIts a very powerful thought.

To be able to trust someone or something so much, must infact be very liberating.

Coz then you surrender all your worries, doubts and fears.

I guess that’s why our ancient traditions laid so much importance on the role of a Guru.

And its definitely true in our corporate lives too.

We all need mentors. And for mentors to be effective, one has to let go of all fears, doubts and insecurities and share what we truly feel.

Digital India – its already here

Today’s the launch of the Digital India initiative and quite a coincidence that I had an experience which makes me believe that Digital India is already here.

Digital India

Here’s what happened.

I was in Mumbai and called for an Uber. I started talking to the cabbie to understand the target market for a specific use case for mTuzo . We are pitching to banks that with mTuzo we can help move their debit card customer from an ATM only to ATM + POS relationship.

So I asked him which bank account he gets his Uber payments in – it was a SBI account and it was his choice. Uber gives him complete freedom to choose the banking partner.

Next I asked him if he had a debit card for that account . Turned out he did.

I asked him if he’s been using that card at ATM or for shopping also. As expected he had been using it only for cash withdrawals.

Probing further I asked him what if he got 15-20% discount if he shopped using his debit card, would he consider switching from cash to card. And his response just stumped me.

He said he’s already used his card for online purchases at SnapDeal. He did his first purchase using COD (cash on delivery) but once he was sure that they delivered just fine, his next transaction was through his debit card,

Let me repeat that – a 30 something male who has been driving a cab in Mumbai for last 10 years, is only schooled till class 10th, who uses his debit card only for cash withdrawal, has used it online at SnapDeal.

And what really really shocked me was his first purchase on SnapDeal. I can bet you will never be able to guess it.

 

 

Take a few guesses…..

 

 

 

…….

He bought a selfie stick for Rs 300 (after a 66% discount). A selfie stick !!!!

I rest my case, Digital India is here.

Maybe we need a Digital Bharat initiative.

 

Mood as the context for marketing

Something very interesting happened while I was using the Linkedin App on my mobile. I liked an article and pop came the message from Linkedin checking if I would want to share my love of the Linkedin App itself.

The timing of this “Rate us on PlayStore” screen intrigued me.

mood based marketingDo folks over at Linkedin believe that if I have read a lengthy article and liked it, I am in a good mood?

If you ask me, may be I am. Atleast for sometime.

And since that mood is caused by the content that was delivered on the Linkedin App, Now might be the best time for ask for a rating. I would rate them much higher.

Maybe they didn’t do this on purpose and this was just a coincidence.

But it still piqued my interest in “Mood as a potential context for marketing“.

Did a quick Google and found that both Apple & Microsoft have applied for patents long ago on Mood based ad targeting. If this is at play, its surely super exciting stuff.

Why?

For one, mood is a very strong context. I remember once being told that the reason behind gorgeous women in skimpy clothes selling electrical switches was to get the predominantly-male-customer distracted and lower the apprehension about the product itself. If that’s been working for ages, surely a more trackable and insight driven model will be more successful.

Also, this might help “push” marketing be more effective. Google driven pull marketing works predominantly on context – what is the customer looking for actively right now. Imagine products and services being thrown just at the right moment. Feeling all mushy thinking about your partner, and pop comes the mention of a romantic cruise. Imagine how hard would it be to not buy it then n there.

The Marketing Funnel at Baapu Market Jaipur

On a recent roadtrip, we went shopping at the famous Baapu Market in Jaipur. Its a bazaar with lots of small shops selling similar stuff mostly fabric, bangles, jewellery and the likes. One is also told to bargain hard when shopping here.

While my wife was excited about the amazing collection of fabric, jewellery etc , I was intrigued by the interesting model that these shopkeepers had adopted.

Baapu Bazaar Jaipur
Baapu Bazaar Jaipur – photo credit Eric Parker/Flickr/MakemyTrip.com

In most shops there were three different types of roles that the owner and staff were playing:

  • The Marketers – One or two people who were stationed outside the shop, about 15-20 steps away. They would shout out loudly about their speciality bangles or suit-pieces or sarees. I felt the idea was to get the attention of the people who were walking around to move towards their shop(s). They essentially brought more attention/traffic to the specific shop. Like many marketing campaigns, there focus was on increasing reach, hence they would spread in a wider catchment area.
  • The Call-to-Action – Then there was this one guy who was right at the entrance of the shop. Now, most shops here have some of their wares displayed right on the footpath. This guy would observe what me or wife were showing interest in, and would try to nudge us in saying there’s an amazing collection inside that we should check out. This is a critical step in their sales cycle. My assumption is that they have figured out that if you step inside the shop once, chances of your buying something increase multifold.
  • The Convertors – Now comes the most interesting part. In most shops (especially those dealing in fabric) one would be expected to remove shoes and sit down for the guy inside the shop to show the collection. I feel that the removing of the shoes and sitting down is like crossing a certain conversion hurdle. The prospect is now almost committed. This person(inside the shop) would be a very calm and relaxed one, who would have the utmost patience of showing us all that we asked. Its easy for one to feel bad for not buying from him since he had spent so much of his time on us. But the fact is, that its we who invest our time and end up feeling its better to buy from here, given that we have spent so much time checking out so many options. Interestingly, these guys came across as very easy to trust and in the absence of brands, its their personality and conduct that drives that trust.

Maybe I was seeing patterns where none exist.

Let me know if you visit this market and see (or fail to see) what I have just described. Will be interesting to hear from you.

Play to your strengths – Digital Banking Toolkit

Nadal is the king of clay. Given a choice of surface, I guess he would choose clay 9 out of 10.

We all get it – one should play to one’s own strength. Its obvious in sports, but most of us fail to apply the same rule(s) in business.

keep-calm-and-play-to-your-strengths

As most banks embrace digital, this is one rule we should not forget.

Look at the bigger PSU banks in India – it’s fair to assume that they have a big list of areas to focus on when it comes to going digital:

  • Channel migration of customers onto internet banking and mobile banking
  • Higher activation and spends on their credit cards
  • Straight Through X-sell campaigns
  • Improving the customer on-boarding experience
  • Reducing TAT for customer transactions and queries
  • …..and so on

It sure can be overwhelming to look at such a big list. One might also be tempted to look at the success stories of the likes of ICICI, Citi or HDFC Bank and try to replicate their strategies.

Will that work? Chances are it won’t !

Why? Because those banks are different. Different in terms of their customer profiles, their capabilities and their partner eco-systems.

When I look at the RBI’s data on ATMs, POS, Credit and Debit cards for Nov 2014 – its clear to me that for PSU banks, ATM presents a unique opportunity.

Digital experience starts from a conversation, an interaction or a transaction – and for PSU banks these are happening in plenty on their debit card portfolio at the ATMs.

SBI has 23.6K onsite and 22K offsite ATMs.And they had 2.4 crore ATM transactions !

Their digital strategy should have a clear ATM story:

  • What opportunity does the ATM transaction present ? E.g. the bank knows where the customer is at that point of time. Using solutions like mTuzo they can share Offers-near the ATM and migrate customers from ATM to ATM+POS.
  • Citibank has just launched Funds Transfer functionality through ATMs. Or one could do mobile recharges.
  • PSU banks do not have an aggressive sales culture. This could be used to their advantage at the ATM, where its not a warm body pushing a product but maybe the thank-you screen which is “suggesting” a product basis past behavior of the customer.

Hence, for any bank embarking on a digital journey, its imperative to ask – What is our strength?

And align the roadmap to play to these strengths!

Crowdsourcing from a captive audience – New approach to complimentary breakfasts

Crowdsourcing is all the rage. And restaurants seem to have caught the fancy.

There is this guy who is spending a good time just getting real feedback before he decides what and where of his restaurant. A few restaurants have decided to skip the printed menu completely. Who wants to pay professional photographers when the customers can click the dishes with their smartphones and create a more powerful visual menu?

Crowdsourced restaurant

So let’s take the example of the first guy –¬†are restaurants keen to know which dishes to keep in their menu? In most of the cases – Yes !

Does crowdsourcing help? Yes !

The data becomes more reliable with increasing volume.

But the challenge remains that if the customers are not repeat (as Groupon showed us) and if they are just looking for the next cullinary adventure, then crowdsourcing might not be too helpful at all. 

Why? Because we may be using the knowledge of segment A to cook and serve a dish for segment B ! There is no positive reinforcement for the individuals who gave feedback. Do they go back and see their feedback implemented?

But take the case where a restaurant has a captive audience.

Let’s say you checked into a hotel. Chances are the breakfast is complimentary and most of the guests would end up eating at the in-house restaurant. And on most days,¬†in a typical hotel, there would only be a small majority of non-guest walk-ins for breakfast.

So shouldn’t the hotel/restaurant try to understand what the guests would like for breakfast? Well I guess if I recommend this to a 5 star hotel, they would say “Sir, our breakfast spread has been carefully crafted after years of research on what our guests typically like. Thats also the reason you will see so many dishes and cuisines. We really care about what you want… Blah Blah Blah”

But consider this. There might be a Bollywood festival in town and suddenly there are more Indians who want Aloo Parathas.Or a Tamilian wedding with guests staying in the hotel, who would all love a dosa.

Well it need not be so drastic, but wouldn’t it be great if the restaurant could ask me what I would like to have. And then maybe come up with the dish over the next few days of my stay. If there are others who like it. Would it not make me thrilled, would it not make me feel special. My guess is it would.

It would also make the chef’s job so much more challenging and exciting.

And also allow the hotel to stay connected with the guests Рguests are not just a room number or ID in their CRM systems.

What do you think?

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Image Credit : http://mashable.com/2014/03/19/dinner-lab-crowdsourced-restaurant