Migrating away from cash is intimidating – Stickiness of Cash Part 2

Ask any payment professional, and while they might disagree on what’s the best payment experience, they would all agree that Cash is sticky.

And one of the core reasons for the stickiness of cash is that the migration journey is intimidating for most cash-heavy users.

Too many choices

Here are some of the many questions the cash users who want to migrate away from cash, grapple with:

  • Is it safe to use a card for payments
  • Should I use a separate card for ATM withdrawals and purchases
  • What should I start using – prepaid, debit, credit , mobile wallets
  • If it’s a card, should I go for a basic, gold, platinum or some other variant
  • Should I get a product with shopping benefits or one with fuel? or the one with air-miles
  • Should I take a Visa or a MasterCard or a Rupay
  • I have accounts with multiple banks, whose product do I begin with
  • How do I apply for the card? Can I apply online, or do I go to the bank branch?
  • What is a UPI or IMPS payment? How do I do that? What is the fees on the transactions?

…….And it goes on and on.

The simple fact is that there are way too many products with different features, brands, offers,benefits and form-factors. It is a tough choice to make.

And post demonetization, most banks are  show-casing ALL their products in each of their ads. Leaving it to the consumer to pick and choose.

I have seen Mumbai buses covered with ads, that have all the digital payment instruments from that bank. Not sure if most consumers even know what those mean.

 

The famous Malcolm Gladwell research on choices, happiness and spaghetti sauce also harps on the risk of too many choices.

The migration away from cash, has to be made easier with fewer choices or a recommended path to walk on (recommendation itself coming from a trusted partner).

In the absence of this, most consumers prefer a wait-and-watch stance. And the product(s) with simpler choices and/or more brand-ambassadors will see higher adoption. No wonder, many a millennial adopted the mobile wallets. There were no variants of PayTM, Mobikwik etc.

And this brings us to the other point.

Hurdles in the migration

Ok, so you have a cash-user who is convinced about that one digital payment from your bank. How does she go about getting started?

Do you remember the forms you filled to get your first credit card.

I remember that during my Deal4Loans days, the card application forms used to have almost 50+ fields across some 4-5 stages of the online application for most banks.

While the consumer on-boarding has come a long way in the digital era, it still is complicated for many products/banks. Unless the consumer is really convinced about this migration, why would they jump through so many hoops to get the product.

The access and on-boarding has to be simpler. A convinced consumer should be active on Day 0 if not within Hour 1.

In my opinion, if we are serious about displacing cash, we need to make the transition a simpler choice for the consumers.

What do you think?


This is part 2 in a series of posts where I try to understand why Cash is sticky? What are the some of the obvious things, we may have overlooked in our zeal to digitize payments.

Here’s part 1 , where my humble submission is that Cash is not really the enemy. Atleast not in the eyes of the consumers.

Cash is not the enemy – Stickiness of Cash Part 1

Why is cash so sticky in our society?

Many of us have argued for the need to build convenience, security and ubiquity for digital payments. And then cash would start receding. No debate there.

But we forget that as individuals our brains are wired to go back to cues that are triggered at the sub-conscious level. We are not always the rational individuals economists would have us to be. Our decisions are influenced more by emotions.

CASH IS NOT THE ENEMY

To appeal at the emotional level, we need either a villain or a hero.

While bankers and payment professionals would disagree with me, but for most Indians cash is NOT the enemy. Consider this:

  • The currency carries images of Mahatma Gandhi, of the National Emblem and now of Mangalyaan etc. These are symbols of national pride. We are wired to feel proud to hold a piece of paper with these images on it.
  • We have traditionally celebrated an auspicious occasion with gifting loved ones with money. This association of gifting currency with happy moments is also tough to break anytime soon. Again deeply rooted positive connect.
  • When the Prime Minister announced the ban of old currency notes, the villain being chased was corruption. Not cash. So we never really took the storyline that cash is bad.

I don’t think any country would even want to walk down the path of trying to build a negative connotation with its currency.

Hence a story where cash is the villain may not work. We need something else to pitch Digital Payments at an emotional level.


This is part 1 in a series of posts where I try to understand why Cash is sticky? What are the some of the obvious things, we may have overlooked in our zeal to digitize payments.

Here’s part 2 , wherein I talk about why its a tough journey moving away from cash – too many choices and a hurdle-ridden on-boarding process.

Beyond Big Data – A Small and fast data example

Big Data is all the rage. Everywhere you go, any meeting or presentation one sits through, Big Data seems to be there.

But there are opportunities beyond big data. E.g. how we handle small data fast.

Here’s an example of small data that I experience almost everyday.

In many corporate buildings in India, you would notice that you need to punch in the desired floor into a panel, which prompts you which lift-car to hop on to.

Small Fast DataSimple yet brilliant solution.

You club the waiting passengers into specific cars by their desired floors. The average wait time is lower, the average travel time to your floor is significantly lower.

And all the magic happens in a jiffy.

The data becomes irrelevant soon (apart from being used by the algorithm for learning and further optimization). And in a classic example of not-so-big-data. But the fact that this small set of inputs from users is taken, crunched and optimized for lift-car allocation in almost real time makes it so amazing.

Small but fast Data.

In Data-led-solutions, the following typically have significant impact:

  • Data-accuracy: How accurate is the data that we feed into the system
  • Data-freshness:How fresh is the data as it moves across the value chain
  • Data-velocity: What is the speed with which we process and move data

This small-data use-case is very high on the data-velocity parameter and I guess just solving for data-velocity has allowed for the solution to be adopted.

So in summary, there is life beyond Big Data too. 🙂

What do you think?

Good rules should be designed for higher adoption

How do we drive adoption for rules in a country, a community?

Should a good rule be easily enforceable too?

I think it should be.

If we want to build a society where most follow the rules, enforceability should be an important criteria.

To decide whether a new rule should be introduced or not. Whether an existing rule needs to be modified or scrapped.

Why?

It is my belief, that when we have rules that can be easily broken without any consequences, it sends a signal to the community. And this signal usually leads to a gradual loss of respect for the law of the land and for the fellow citizens.

 

A good rule should be easily enforced

Let me explain with an example of two rules, which most of us are familiar with

  • Front seat passengers should wear seat belts while traveling in a car
  • All vehicles should have a valid pollution-under-control (PUC) certificate

While both these were introduced in the last 20 years or so in NCR, the first one has seen significant levels of adoption whereas we all know that very few cars and bikes have a valid PUC certificate.

Why?

If you ask me, the reason is very simple.

For seat-belts, the fact that you are complying (or not) is visible each and every time you are driving. Any traffic-cop who sees you not wearing the seat belt can pull you over and issue a challan. So you run a very high risk of being punished if you are out on the road w/o wearing your seat belts.

Contrast this with the pollution certificate rule.

A traffic cop on the road has no clue if your vehicle currently has a valid PUC certificate or not. Hence the cop would rarely pull you aside asking for the certificate. It is usually asked for when you have already been stopped for some reason and they feel that they might put more pressure on you if you are w/o the PUC. Hence as car owners, we are usually not very afraid to drive w/o this certificate. The risk is just too low. And hence very few cars actually have a valid PUC certificate.

So while almost everyone knows that the laws need them to drive a non-polluting vehicle, very few actually end up doing so.

And I think its very simply just the issue of how easily the rule can be enforced.

In my opinion we should have few rules, but all should be enforced strictly.

What do you think?

Search Vs Social – the long tail of ad revenues

Google and Facebook together took away 64% of the total US online advertising spends. And Facebook had around 65% of the overall online display ad-spends. These are incredible levels of consolidation in the ad spends among the leaders.

search vs social long tail

Enough has been said and discussed about

While one cannot argue with the numbers and the line of reasoning, I somehow felt that this discussion has ignored the long tail of ad-revenues or the lead generation aspect of these platforms. These reports are focused on big co’s with big media budgets who may typically have brand-building as the key target.

Let me explain this in some more detail.

There is no doubt that for Google or Facebook, the big marketing dollars would come in from big spenders like Ford, Coca-Cola & Pepsis, Samsung, Levis, Red Bull, Wells Fargo, Amex etc.

But if we were to evaluate these platforms from a start-up point of view (small budgets and maybe need to do lead generation instead of brand building), the story is very different.

1. Social targeting is profile based, too many bidders

On Facebook, the same user may be targeted by multiple brands, because there is hardly any other context. E.g. a 35 yr old male who lives in a metro and has liked multiple lifestyle brands would be a good target for many.

We do NOT have additional context for the specific session on FB when the ad is being displayed. One FB session is hardly different from another in terms of the intent or maybe when mood based marketing algorithms evolve things would change.

This means, each of the target users FB session will appeal to all the brands. Multiple brands would be vying for that same ad-impression, which in turn means higher bid rates and CPMs etc etc.

And this means that small budget advertisers would be elbowed out of the platform by big budget cos.

While this article on Forbes also has the same conclusion, the logic used is very different.

2. Search has deep context, removes non-relevant advertisers

Search on the other hand has hugely relevant context. E.g. a user looking for Mortgage loan options on Google will be targeted by Financial Services brands vs someone searching for Fine Dining Options in India.

And this means, that as an advertiser you are just competing with other competitors or maybe some adjacent industry players.

Bid rates would be lower and even with small budgets one can get the message out to a relevant audience.

3. Lead qualification is efficient on search

If one is looking at online advertising for lead generation, chances are search may be a better platform.

Before the Facebook fans pounce on me, let me qualify my statement.

Many of us run “boring” ventures – we pitch services that consumers may not want to share. And/or we do not have the creative bench strength to get a funny/interesting message out. Our content strategy may still be a WIP. Realities of life.

If the message/ad we create has low viral coefficient (i.e. we do not expect people to share it much), Facebook may not be the best platform. Coz then we are burning marketing dollars to talk to a prospect who may not be primed for our services and who is also not helping spread the word.

Google, on the other hand is a very different story. If a consumer is online actively writing into the search box key words that resonate with your offerings, you may have a very interested customer. Intent is high.

Also, my guess would be that the long-tail ad-spends are stickier.


But all this is just my 2 cents on how small ventures, start-ups and SMEs should look at spending their advertising money online – across the broad theme of Search Vs Social Marketing for the long tail in particular.

What do you think?

 

Unit Economics in the times of Auction Marketing Models

Unit Economics is all we hear these days in the consumer technology world. Unfortunately for many start-ups seeking venture funds, this is the biggest hurdle they need to cross to build a strong case for their business.

What is the concept of Unit Economics

I will not go into the definition and relevance of Unit Economics. That’s well documented here and here. Or just Google it.

Lets refer to Microeconomics 101 for our discussion – Marginal Costs(MC) and Marginal Revenue(MR). We all know that its a healthy sign if Marginal Revenues are higher than Marginal costs. And this delta (MR-MC) is what is unit economics.

On the other hand, if we are losing money on each transaction, either we see the losses reducing or we stop growing transaction volumes.

At least rational individuals would choose to do so. Or so goes the basic Economics assumption.

Unit Economics in web/mobile start-ups

  1. Marginal costs are volatile

A big chunk of a start-ups costs is the customer acquisition cost. ( I am excluding businesses with very high repeat volumes in early days where the operating costs contribute heavily to the overall transaction costs).

Most start-ups need to market their products and services. They are in a continuous state of transaction ramp-up along with concurrent improvements in experience or efficiency.

And in a world where most advertising/marketing channels are bid/auction model driven – this translates into the marginal costs being highly volatile. How volatile?

  • In the early days when you don’t have the luxury of brand-pull or of time, almost 60-70% of transactions may be coming from Google Adwords/Facebook/Ad-networks. Meaning 60% of your business is not insulated from pricing shocks.
  • Bid-rates may vary as much as 30-40% to maintain the same positioning. Maybe more, if there is a competitor who has just raised a round. Also, if you are competing in a category where big brands play, anything can happen. E.g. At Deal4Loans, we had seen bid-rates on our key-words jump significantly every time a competitor raised venture money or a bank launched a new digital campaign.
  • Add to this that the conversion-rates of your campaigns have not yet stabilized. Remember, these are early days, you are experimenting on your landing pages, and funnel optimization is still underway. So the final cost per account gets even more volatile.

2. Customer Pricing is relatively in-elastic

Theoretically, if you could pass on the burden of increased bid-rates and hence the ups/downs in marginal costs on to the consumer, your unit economics would be safe. The neighborhood vegetable vendor who has daily-prices does exactly this and is hence able to retain his margins.

Unit Economics

But this is rarely possible. Pricing is just not that elastic.  Most mobile/web start-ups can not /do not change prices so frequently.

3. Marginal Cost CURVE is UNPREDICTABLE AND NOT SMOOTH

We know that the bid-rates can inflict wild fluctuations(as seen in pt1) in the cost of acquisition, thereby making it unpredictable. But a bigger challenge is that the Marginal Cost curve is not smooth.

Realistic MC MR Curve

One rarely finds gradual changes in marginal costs with increasing through-put. It happens in unpredictable steps. Here’s why

  • Each fluctuation in effective bid-rate leads to drastic ups/downs
  • As a start-up you are experimenting with multiple channels. Success in any one will bring down the blended MC immediately.
  • Referral/Viral coefficient and % of in-bound of the campaigns can impact the costs significantly. e.g. One PR mention may bring in huge self-select traffic.
  • SEO traffic which is typically very predictable can also swing wildly with a new Google update as we saw with Penguin and Panda.

So what do we do?

  • Keep Experimenting. Do know that customer-acquisition at optimal price is a moving target. You are never really truly there. It can always be better.
  • Invest early in content. In-bound has significant ripple effects.
  • Raise money but don’t throw it all on branding. Consumer memory is short lived. Discover and test more channels, unlock access to more segments.

I would love to hear from bootstrapped ventures as to how they are/have handled the customer acqui costs. What worked, what didn’t?

Public policy, ripple effects and feedback loops

I have always been intrigued by product design and by extension policy design (& implementation). If the government were to look at itself as a start-up technology venture, the policies, schemes and guidelines issued by the government would possibly be the “products” of this venture.

And like any good product manager, one should study not just the immediate impact of change(s) in product design but also the delayed and maybe stickier changes in consumer behaviour.

And that is what I want to share with you today.

Shift in dietary habits due to Green Revolution

Sometime last month, I was visiting an uncle of mine – someone who is in his mid 70s, reasonably fit, exercises regularly and has borderline diabetes. While we sat at the lunch table, I noticed that he had multiple other grains in his roti as against mine which was from just wheat atta. It seems most physicians recommend adding ragi, chana etc in your atta mix as a healthier alternative.

And that’s how our conversation began.

Wheat Green Revolution

And what came out was quite surprising for me.

It seems in their childhood days in villages of western U.P., wheat was not the staple grain. Infact it was considered a delicacy and wheat-chapattis were made when they had guests over. And he comes from a well-to-do farmer family. This was not because of economic constraints, it was just how things were.

So as the elders started talking about this significant shift in probably the most important component in a typical North-Indian meal – roti – what emerged was that the shift was triggered by the Green Revolution in all probability.

This lunch group which included scientists and government employees, agreed to the following sequence of events:

  • Wheat was one of the chosen candidates for green revolution . Though am very curious to find out why?
  • Government stepped in on the supply side with higher yield varieties, irrigation support etc
  • It also created artificial demand by setting up floor prices thus encouraging farmers to grow wheat. Making wheat a critical component of Public Distribution System also ensured a big buyer for wheat at these prices. This in turn ensured that a higher percentage of land under cultivation now got sowed with wheat
  • This brought the otherwise-considered-premium grain into the middle-class households at a very affordable price. Imagine if suddenly, you find yourself able to afford an item which for years or maybe generations was considered premium, chances are you will buy more of it to feel good (my assumption)
  • And they all started eating wheat more, skewing our diet heavily towards this singular grain in North India.
  • And the subsequent generation(s) like ours has come to believe that our rotis have always been a wheat-only product. Coz wheat rotis is what we ever saw.

Am also very clear that India’s self-reliance on nutrition has been contributed heavily by progress on wheat and rice. So there’s no doubt that this has worked as planned.

The fact that wheat may not be the healthiest grain is probably something new. Gluten intolerance was probably unheard of during the Green Revolution.

But with the new facts before us, should the government re-evaluate its focus on just a handful of grains in its policies.

What if, the support prices on wheat are relaxed a bit? What if other “healthier” grains are encouraged similarly? Will the cost of managing supply chains and warehousing for multiple grains offset the advantages of a wider-spread in our diet?

Many questions and I don’t have any answers.

Low availability of fodder for cattle

Ask any elder who has seen standing wheat crop in the fields now-a-days vs in the old days. One thing they would tell you is that the wheat crop is now stunted. Its much much shorter.

This am told, was probably one of the biggest breakthrough in developing High-Yield-Varieties. The nutrients and water is no longer “wasted” in the growth of the non-grain-yielding parts of the crop.

But on the flip side – this has increased the cost of cattle-management for local farmers. Why?

There just isn’t enough fresh fodder for the cattle. The non-grain part of the wheat crop was used as fresh and dried fodder for the cattle that the farmer had at home. This is gone.

As my friend (who runs a dairy farm) tells me, procuring fodder is now a big challenge in most regions.


I am not an economist or an agriculture scientist and probably have understood just a very small part of the whole picture here.

But I learnt few important lessons from this lunch conversation :

  1. There are usually multiple ripple-effects of any new policy change ( or product change)
  2. While the product may deliver on the core metrics initially identified as measurements of success, we should zoom-out and ask ourselves, what else has changed
  3. I should start eating healthier. Right now  🙂

Payments are a critical piece – Digital Banking ToolKit

In India, digital and mobile Payments is a really HOT space right now.

  • HDFC Bank introduced PayZapp which intends to be the gateway for all m-commerce transactions, with incremental offers as the initial incentive
  • ICICI bank introduced “Pockets” – a way for even non-ICICI Bank customers to have access to mobile payments
  • Axis bank launched Ping Pay and Lime
  • 11 new Payment Bank Licences have been issued. This not only includes some of the bigger telecom players but also the likes of PayTm.

All this action is triggered by multiple factors including a huge opportunity to move transactions away from cash. In the fact that ecommerce is booming and so is the comfort that consumers have in paying online or through mobile. Mobile, smartphone and 3G penetration is booming etc etc.

But from a bank’s perspective, payments are critical.

Why?

Payments are high-frequency use case

You would probably take 3.5 loans in your life.

Your salary gets credited into the account once a month. If you have a SIP instruction, the investments may also happen once a month.

You withdraw cash probably once a week.

But you make maybe multiple payment transactions everyday. And in most cases, banks do not have an idea of the payments we make.

More transactions allow banks to have more interactions with their consumers and hence move a step closer to being an Everyday Bank (Accenture coined this interesting term to bring banking into consumer’s day-to-day activities).

Payments provide rich-context

During my brief stint in the Life Insurance industry, the key challenge was that post acquisition, there is not much context to go back and start a dialogue with the customer.

The same is true (or will soon be true) for banks that miss out on the payments. Access to payment level data gives so much deeper insights into the consumer.

The bank understands where do you spend (which markets, which segments), when do you spend, your typical ticket size etc. This is really powerful data, which can help generate insights into customer segments and their needs. E.g. a banking customer who pays school fees (for her kids) online has told the bank that she might be a good target to be pitched Children Plans (life insurance).

It can also help the bank design better products that resonate more with the consumers.

Payments will see sticky behavior

In the early days of Digital Banking, it was said that the bank which manages to get Bill Payments on to its account will be a sticky account. If you can get the customer to map his utility payments etc, you were on a path to be the preferred banking account.

Why ?

Because these are important transactions yet not something customer wants to spend a lot of time on. Hence if he gets used to a specific platform/UI – until and unless something changes drastically, the customer would not move. Same reason why I am so loyal to PayTm ever since they made it so easy to pay bills and do set-top box recharges.

The bank or service provider, which onboards customers to a frictionless platform will be tough to unseat.

Marshmallow Test and Insurance Marketing

I spent the last week reading up “The Marshmallow Test by Walter Mischel”. And while the book is a fascinating summary of key findings (and some of its applications) from Walters more than three decades of research, I found some of it is relevant for how we look at Insurance Marketing and Sales.

What is the Marshmallow Test

Walter’s team designed a test for pre-schoolers where the kids were asked to pick their favourite treats from Oreos, marshmallows etc. One of the treats was placed in a tray in front of the kid on a table. The table had a bell, which the kid could ring to bring back the researcher. There was another tray which had two of the same treats, on the same table. The kid was told, that the researcher needs to step out. If the kid wants to bring back the researcher she can just ring the bell, but then he/she gets just one treat. On the other hand, if the kid waits for the researcher to return on her own, she could have two treats.

As one would expect, there were all sorts of experiences that were witnessed in this experiment – from kids who waited easily, to those who found it very painful, to even those who ate the cream from all three Oreos and kept it back as if they had not been touched at all :-).

Walters team ran these tests and tried to understand how the human mind manages self-control, Takes decisions which can postpone instant gratification. What techniques work and which ones fail, consistently. And in all of these interesting findings, I found these as most relevant for Insurance Marketing.

Me Vs Them, Now Vs Future – HOT & COOL Minds

In multiple versions of the tests it was discovered that when asked, whats the logical thing to do for someone who is given the option of 1 treat now vs 2 in the near future. Every kid said that any smart one would wait. And interestingly when the same kids were asked, what would you do – most of them responded by saying “I would take the one treat”. Walter believes that this is due to what he calls the HOT and COOL brain system getting activated. When its a hypothetical situation that involves someone else, the cool mind takes over – it is good at coming up with rational and logical answers and hence every one knows that we should wait. But when the situation involves us and in the present, the hot mind takes over. This is where it becomes tough to manage the temptation.

The book talks about another experiment conducted by Hershfield, where in participants (in their mid twenties) were asked to create a digital avatar of themselves. For one set of participants, they were shown their regular avatar and asked how much would they invest in retirement planning. And the other group was shown their own aged avatar (aged mid-sixties) and asked the same question. Surprise surprise, those who saw their future self said they would save 30% more than those who saw their normal self.

marshmallow test insurance marketing
Source: HBR (link below)

Read about this interesting study on how we make better retirement planning decisions here on HBR.

This tells me few things (& I would love to hear what you read into the findings)

  1. Insurance purchase decisions are very similar to the Marshmallow test conditions. You forego immediate spends for deferred benefits.
  2. Walter discovered that the specific tactics that were adopted by each kid who waited (for the better rewards) fell into a generic category – Cool the now, heat the future. Which means, reduce the temptations of the immediate future and build temptations around the choice of waiting. Sounds logical, and there are good insights for Insurance sales and especially renewals. Buying on monthly installments is easier as the psychological barrier is 12 times higher than when buying an annual policy. Auto-renewal (Standing Instructions or Auto Debit) is better for persistency, as the consumer is not subjected to the same choices every year.
  3. Personalization – Creating Insurance ads that showcase a happy retired life may not trigger purchase decisions, because the consumer may or may see himself in the lead actor of the TV ad. If he doesn’t, chances are he understands the theory of why insurance is needed, but when presented by a choice to buy, he would forego. And this infact has been the experience of most life insurance products. We have only moved a step in this direction with calculators and personalized models for generating scenarios. But they are far from effective in building a true connect with the future self of the user. Calculators and models talk to the cool mind, what we need are ways to get the buyer involved actively in the future self. And decide now in favor of the future self or future selves of his/her dependents.
  4. I see a bright future for digital in Insurance marketing – we have been going at it in the wrong way. Cheaper term plans is not the only opportunity here. Disintermediation and cost-saves is just one slice. The Insurance agent was selling successfully not only coz of the trust & proximity he has with customers. Maybe he can narrate stories from closer home, talk to the customer by giving vivid examples and building scenarios where the customer can easily imagine himself and his family.

Like all interesting studies on behavioral economics and psychology, I feel Marshmallow Test is a great set of hypotheses to bring into the marketing themes and design of campaigns.

Showing Contact Addresses in Google Maps

Quick Summary:

Here’s a small product feature recommendation for Google Maps on Android. Currently when I am in Google Maps and typing in the search box, it throws results that match with Google Places directory on the web. If it also throws matches with local contacts in the phone (or Google account) that have an address field added, it will ease usage.

Google Maps & Contacts
Background:

A quick background will help understand the use-case much better. I was travelling to Jaipur and wanted to go to my friend’s place in Bani Park. I had asked him for his address the day before and stored that in the phone’s contact against his name. Now when I was close to Bani park and looking for exact directions to his place, I had to

  • go to the Contacts,
  • search for his name,
  • View and copy the address,
  • Close Contacts and open Google Maps,
  • click on search(in GMaps) and paste the address (without the door number etc),
  • See the matching list of places from Googles Places directory,
  • Choose the right one and get started

Recommended Solution:

It would have been so much easier if

  • I go to G Maps
  • Click on search and type the friend’s name
  • IF there is an address field against it, gets thrown up
  • [CHALLENGE] – Smartly remove the part(s) of address like door or flat number and match it with Google Places
  • Get started

Better still would be if
GMaps and contact addresses
Once I have used the (text based) address for directions inside maps for the first time, it asks me to “pin” the place on the map when i reach my destination,so that an accurate latlon (latitude longitude) can be entered in a hidden field against this address.

If this pinning of a text address is done, it can add more wow – as soon as I open up Google Maps at a particular location, it can show me my pins in the vicinity – no more typing or searching needed – just choose the pin for directions and get started.

What do you think?

Is this something that would make your GMaps experience better? Do let me know in the comments section below – will love to hear your feedback.

#Android #GoogleMaps #GMaps #Google